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RJ-45 Diagrams






 

This page is provided by TECI and gives you the  information to create both standard and reverse patch cable wiring diagrams.

RJ-45 Standard Patch Cable Wiring Diagram

 

If you hold the RJ-45 connector facing you (as if you were going to plug it into your mouth) with the lock tab/clip on the bottom, the pins are numbered 8 to 1 from left to right. The pin usage should be the same for both ends of the cable and is as follows:

 

 

Standard Patch Cable (Both Ends)

Pin Number

Assignment

Color

1

Output Data (+)

orange/white

2

Output Data (-)

orange solid

3

Input Data (+)

green/white

4

Reserved for Telephone use

blue solid

5

Reserved for Telephone use

blue/white

6

Input Data (-)

green solid

7

Reserved for Telephone use

brown/white

8

Reserved for Telephone use

brown solid

 

If you don't follow this exact wiring or color scheme, you should at least wire your cable so that the two output data conductors (1 & 2) make up one twisted pair and the two input data conductors (3 & 6) make up another twisted pair. (One "pair" consists of two twisted wires: One wire is solid colored; the other wire is the same color, but has a white stripe [orange solid & orange/white are a pair]). If the cable is not paired correctly (mixing colors or mistakenly using 3 & 4 on one pair and 5 & 6 on another pair or splitting the assignment types between pairs), it may work for lengths less than a meter, but will fail miserably for longer lengths.

 


 

RJ-45 Crossover Patch Cable Wiring Diagram

 

If you are connecting two machines to each other, it is possible to avoid using a hub by swapping the output data and input data pairs (1 & 2 swapped with 3 & 6, respectively).  This change is all that's required to make a crossover cable.  One end is wired as if the cable was going to be a standard patch cable, while the other end is wired with the input data and output data pairs swapped.  This swap feeds the output data of one (local) computer to the input data of the second (distant) computer, and vice-versa.  In other words, the orange and green pairs are switched at one of the ends.  The polarity at the switched end remains unchanged (stripes are still strips and solids are still solids).  The pin usage for each end of the cable is as follows:

 

 

Crossover Patch Cable (RJ-45 End at Local Computer)

Pin Number

Assignment

Color

1

Output Data (+)

orange/white

2

Output Data (-)

orange solid

3

Input Data (+)

green/white

4

Reserved for Telephone use

blue solid

5

Reserved for Telephone use

blue/white

6

Input Data (-)

green solid

7

Reserved for Telephone use

brown/white

8

Reserved for Telephone use

brown solid

 

Crossover Patch Cable (RJ-45 End at Distant Computer)

Pin Number

Assignment

Color

1

Input Data (+)

green/white

2

Input Data (-)

green solid

3

Output Data (+)

orange/white

4

Reserved for Telephone use

blue solid

5

Reserved for Telephone use

blue/white

6

Output Data (-)

orange solid

7

Reserved for Telephone use

brown/white

8

Reserved for Telephone use

brown solid

 

Again, if you don't follow this exact wiring or color scheme, you should at least wire your cable so that each data channel (its positive and negative signals) uses both conductors of a twisted pair. If the cable is not paired correctly, it may work for lengths less than a meter, but will fail miserably for longer lengths.